Marine Engineering

Program ● Interactive ● Grades PK-2

What causes something to sink or float? How can engineers help explore and protect the ocean below? These questions and more are all explored in Junior Marine. In this class, students explore the concepts of marine engineering and mechanics, harnessing the power of water, and discovering designs that help us make the impossible, possible.

Marine engineering has existed since the time of the earliest ships, it has been called by other names, such as ocean engineering and marine mechanical engineering. Engineers in this discipline deal primarily with designing and maintaining the moving parts located below-deck in ships. With the advent of modern technology, marine engineers also oversee the design of other ship components, such as propellers, stabilizers, and rescue systems. Marine engineering is also closely tied to naval architecture.

Examples of a marine engineer’s responsibilities:

  • Design and maintain engine systems for private and commercial vessels.
  • Oversee the operation of propulsion, mechanical, and critical electrical systems.
  • Manage and analyze logistics data related to the optimization of nautical mechanical processes.
  • Draw schematics and diagram layouts of parts and machinery.
  • Prepare documentation and manuals for mechanics to use during the routine operation ofengines and other large machinery.
  • Use the Engineering Design Process to produce products as safe and efficient as possible.

Does Your Boat Float?

In this introductory class, students explore the basics of floating and sinking. Through exploration, students discover that a ball of Play-Doh will sink but if the Play-Doh is shaped into a boat, it can float. Students work to create their own signs and answer the question: does your boat float?

This lesson also has a camp version
Camp: Wings, Wheels, and Sails Camp (link)
      Lesson Name: Does Your Boat Float?
Camp: Pirate Academy Camp (link)
      Lesson Name: Does Your Boat Float? 
Camp: Medieval Defense Camp (link)
      Lesson Name: Does Your Boat Float?

Flow-n-Go Boat

Students discover how Newton's laws can help us create inventive designs in this lesson. Students work to design their very own gravity-powered boat that uses water as the fuel. In the extension, students discuss scale and work to create a smaller version of the same boat for a smaller passenger.

Just Like Jacques

Students are amazed by the wonders of the ocean deep. In this class, students learn about Jacques Costeau and all of his wonderful designs that helped him and others explore the ocean below. Students create their very own Cartesian diver, and in the extension work to uncover buried treasure.

Paddle Boats

Boats moving through water is an amazing engineering marvel. Students join us for an investigation of potential and kinetic energy and apply their new-found knowledge to create a paddle boat that can move across a tub of water.

This lesson also has a camp version
Camp: Junior Power and Energy Camp (Junior Engineering of Power and Energy) (link)
      Lesson Name: Paddleboats and Waterwheels

Pontoon Boats

In this lesson, students explore how pontoons help boats float and carry heavy loads and test the amount of weight a boat can hold with and without pontoons and with pontoons of various sizes

Restore the Reef & Extension: Coral Reef Ecosystem

Marine engineers do more than just build boats! Oftentimes, marine engineers work hand-in-hand with other types of engineers. When it comes to protecting the ocean, marine engineers work closely with environmental engineers to restore and protect some of our valuable resources. In this lesson, students work to restore the reef and reintroduce animals back into their habitat after restoration.

This lesson also has camp and birthday party versions.
Camp: Twisted Fairy Tales Camp (link)
      Lesson Name: Swim Away 
Camp: Kelvin's Kitchen (link)
      Lesson Name: Restore the Reef & It's Ecosystem
Party: Beach Party (link)
      Lesson Name: Restore the Reef

Row Your Boat

In this lesson, students explore principles of floating, sinking, and buoyancy, compare a canoe to other types of boats, and explore the basic mechanics of canoe design

Scaling, Scaling

In this lesson, students compare objects in terms of larger and smaller and create a smaller version of a low-n-go boat

Smooth Sailing

In this lesson, students investigate how the sail of a sail boat captures the wind and moves the boat forward. In the extension, students look at pontoons and discover how different pontoons change the amount of weight a boat can hold before it starts to sink.

This lesson also has a camp version
Camp: Pirate Academy (link)
      Lesson Name: Sailing Away

Treasure Hunter

In this lesson, students design a hook that allows their Cartesian driver to retrieve buried treasure, understand how engineers modify and change designs to improve the usefulness of an object or tool

This lesson also has a camp version
Camp: Pirate Academy (link)
      Lesson Name: Diving for Treasure

Waterwheel

Boats moving through water is an amazing engineering marvel. In this lesson, students see how the same basic concepts are used to design waterwheels.

This lesson also has a camp version
Camp: Junior Power and Energy Camp (Junior Engineering of Power and Energy) (link)
      Lesson Name: Paddleboats and Waterwheels