Environmental Engineering

Program ● Interactive ● Grades PK-2

Chemical Environmental engineers are responsible for creating designs that help us solve problems found in the environment. These engineers work hard to design ways to reduce air and water pollution, increase recycling efforts, and to increase the efficiency of waste disposal. The field of environmental engineering is growing quickly as people gain interest in protecting and preserving our environment. Some examples of an environmental engineer’s responsibilities include:

  • Design and evaluate erosion control systems.
  • Develop systems and process for managing waste.
  • Design and manage water control systems.
  • Inspect, evaluate, and regulate government and industry for compliance with standards for environmental protection.
  • Design mitigation for air, ground, and water pollution.

Thinking Green

Are you ready to get down and dirty searching for solutions to some of our biggest environmental problems? In Junior Environmental, students ponder some truly “hot” environmental issues. Students in this class save endangered animals, help plants grow and create protection from the sun’s heat. By investigating natural process like erosion, animal adaptations, and plant growth; we discover ways that we as engineers can be inspired by the world around us to take on all sorts of challenges.

A Recipe for Soil

Not every plant can grow in every environment. In Greenhouse, students explore dirt discovering that there are many different kinds of soil. Working as environmental engineers, students will work to create the perfect soil recipe for their plants.

This lesson has also been used as a camp lesson
Camp: Kelvin's Kitchen (link)
      Lesson Name: Greenhouse and A Recipe for Soil

Animal Influences

In the lesson, students get inspired by animal characteristics and build their very own boat.

This lesson can be used as either a extension to Goin' Fishin' or a stand alone lesson 

Goin' Fishin'

In the lesson, Goin’ Fishin’, students will work as an environmental engineer to design a fishing net that reduces the number of endangered sea turtles caught by commercial fishermen. In the lesson extension, students get inspired by animal characteristics and build their very own boat.

This lesson can be extended using the Animal Influences lesson 
This lesson has also been used as camp and birthday party lessons
Camp: Kelvin's Kitchen (link)
      Lesson Name: Goin’ Fishin’ 
Camp: Pirate Academy (link)
      Lesson Name: Goin’ Fishin’
Party: Beach Party (link)
      Lesson Name: Goin’ Fishin’

Going on a Bear Hunt

We’re going on a Bear Hunt in the final Day of Camp Kelvin. Students will create a magnifying glass to observe tiny forest creatures as well as building a compass to find their way to our destination, the bear’s cave! Students will cap the week off by taking home their projects and vests.

Greenhouse

Not every plant can grow in every environment. In Greenhouse, students explore dirt discovering that there are many different kinds of soil. Working as environmental engineers, students will design their very own functioning greenhouse.

This lesson can be extended using the A Recipe for Soil lesson 
This lesson has also been used as a camp lesson
Camp: Kelvin's Kitchen (link)
      Lesson Name: Greenhouse and A Recipe for Soil 

Irrigation Canal

In the lesson, students design an irrigation canal that will transport water over land from a river to a farm.

This lesson can be used as either a extension to Save the Beach or a stand alone lesson 
This lesson has also been used as a camp lesson
Camp: Engineers Under Construction (link)
      Lesson Name: Save Our City! 

Recycling Fun!

How can we reuse materials to cut down on the trash we create? What is the difference between reuse and recycle? These questions and more are explored during Recycling Fun where students brainstorm ways to reuse materials and recycle some of those materials to build a model car and recreate their favorite toy.

This lesson can be used as either a extension to Reuse and Recycle or a stand alone 

Reuse and Recycle

How can we reuse materials to cut down on the trash we create? What is the difference between reuse and recycle? These questions and more are explored during Reuse and Recycle where students brainstorm ways to reuse materials.

This lesson can be extended using the Recycling Fun! 

Save the Beach

For this activity, students will investigate beach erosion and create a design that will protect their beach from eroding when exposed to water and air.

This lesson can be extended using the Irrigation Canal 
This lesson has also been used as camp and birthday party lessons
Camp: Engineers Under Construction (link)
      Lesson Name: Save Our City!
Party: Beach Party (link)
      Lesson Name: Save the Beach

Solar Power

In Solar Power, students discuss the positive and negative effects of sun light and create a design to insulate Heat Sensitive Hypercolor thinking putty and prevent it from changing colors when exposed to heat.

This lesson can be extended using the Sun Painting. 
This lesson has also been used as a camp lesson
Camp: Power and Energy Camp (link)
      Lesson Name: Solar Power 

Sun Painting

In the lesson, students create their very own Sun Painting print using everyday objects further demonstrating the power of the sun.

This lesson can be used as either a extension to Solar Power or a stand alone lesson.

Thinking Green

During the Thinking Green lesson, students will design a house using natural materials showing that thinking “green” takes a lot of creative thinking and problem solving.

This lesson can be extended using the Where's Kelvin lesson.

Turn Up the Heat

Its time to Turn Up The Heat on Day 4 of Camp Kelvin. Students will construct a solar oven to roast their marshmallows instead of building a fire. Students will also create lanterns for use at night on their camping trip.

Where's Kelvin?

In the lesson, students will explore the concept of camouflage and see how engineers have borrowed this animal characteristic in designs for protective clothing and gear.

This lesson can be used as either a extension to Thinking Green or a stand alone lesson.

Who Eat's Who?

Find out why the fish swam away from the shark! Students will discover the food chain and the importance it has in our environment. They will also identify the role of a producer and a consumer in the food chain. Students will then create their own three level food chain model.

This lesson has also been used as a camp lesson
Camp: Twisted Fairy Tales (link)
      Lesson Name: Who Eat's Who?